Publications

What I’m Reading: Jazz, Jimi, and Janitors Edition

Photo by Jimmy Baikovicius via Flickr.

Photo by Jimmy Baikovicius via Flickr.

1) Museumist has written about art museum Super Bowl bets in the past, and even tweeted about the book-based trash talking that Kansas City and Toronto public libraries were engaged in just this week. Now, the world of museums and sports are colliding in a jazzy way. Kansas City’s American Jazz Museum and the Louis Armstrong House Museum based in New York City have put their gift shops on the line over the outcome of the Royals-Mets World Series.

2) Speaking of musical mashups, did you know George Frideric Handel and Jimi Hendrix were neighbors? Though over 200 years apart, they lived next door to each other on Brook Street in London’s Mayfair neighborhood. This February, you can experience this musical odd couple’s co-existence with the opening of Handel & Hendrix in London.

3) Halloween is nigh, and no one is geeking out over the holiday quite like museums. Pictorial examines the Halloween-inspired nerd fest that museums are engaging in on Instagram.

4) My heart goes out to the cleaning lady at the Museion Bozen-Bolzano, a contemporary art museum in South Tyrol, who threw an entire art installation in the trash thinking it was detritus from a party the night before. If she just threw it away because she thought it was bad art, then I might think she’s a bit of a bad ass.

5) Someone else who is having a bad week is the Museum of the Bible, and they haven’t even opened yet.  They are under investigation for violating the 8th Commandment—that one about bearing false witness— over 200-300 illegally imported artifacts seized by customs.

Marketing

You Can’t Please Everybody

Photo by John Fischer via Flickr.

Photo by John Fischer via Flickr.

This past August, Mother Jones ran an article exploring the wonderfully amusing world of one-star reviews that people award the United States’ National Parks. Of course, sometimes natural beauty is not enough and people may have legitimate grievances about their visit—rude staff, dirty bathrooms, etc.—but sometimes people are just being irrational and write reviews complaining about how the desert is “too hot.” As a result, I was inspired to explore some of the bad reviews that people post about some of the world’s more well-known museums, and, wouldn’t you know it, our cultural institutions’ overall ratings are constantly being dragged down by confounding and humorous posts from the discontented. Here’s a brief look at some visitors’ complaints…

On the Insufficient Benefits of Using a Corporate Card

In a review of New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, Anthro Food E. noted: “…I did come in later though just out of curiosity, but with my corporate discount (free) card of course (since i refuse to pay any amount of money to see antiques collecting dust)…and after 10 minutes, i already had ADD…i wasnt interested in any of the fake rembrandts they had to show at this museum nor any other pieces of art here either…” Quite frankly, I’m surprised they made it 10 minutes.

On Being Lured in By the Swirly Things

Now, I am among those that think cramming a trip to the Louvre into your Parisian itinerary is a bit of a waste. Apparently, Franq F. of Los Angeles agrees with me, but for different reasons. Here’s his one-star review on Yelp:

So, like, we were so excited to go to this museum because it was on so many websites. Well, we were absolutely disgusted and felt so ripped off. They totally fool you with all the new stuff outside, like all the cool glass stuff and swirly things and new, clean stuff. THEN when you go inside, IT IS DISGUSTING. There is literally like all old things, it is dark and so, so old. All of the paintings are so old, they are cracked; SICK! Who cares, none of it even looks real or anything. What a joke. It’s like, “Hey, France, way to trick us into thinking it was going to be a new, clean museum but then we get inside and it is ‘tow up.!” They obviously lure you in with the good stuff and then you are in this musty piece of junk. Like, you’re FRANCE…a country; why did you do it on the cheap, why not knock the junky crap building down and start over. It was such a rip. Fail.

Photo by TMAB2003 via Flickr.

Photo by TMAB2003 via Flickr.

On How to Deal with Being the Cause of Environmental End Times

A few Yelp commenters remarked that the California Academy of Sciences was a little too on-message with the whole global warming thing, but Rob S. had a suggestion for how visitors can cope: “…the lesson that man is killing off just about everything and diligently working toward environmental end times is woven into just about every exhibit. If you wanted to create a drinking game geared toward alcohol poisoning, just take a shot every time you see a reference to global warming, a species or area being threatened by man or the fragility of our planet.”

On Staff Recommendations

Having worked in and around museums for nearly a decade, I’m not immune to the fact that museum security guards are not universally loved. One commenter, particularly displeased with the guards at the Met, offered this suggestion: “The security staff here can DIAF, please.” That’s Die In A Fire for those of you playing along at home. At least he said please.

On Backhanded Compliments

Clearly not a fan of how the Creation Museum can play a little fast and loose with the facts, Daniel T. from Denver offered up an exhibit review: “But by far, the best exhibit they have is a dinosaur with a saddle on its back. That’s right, a dinosaur wearing a fucking saddle…”

Photo by freeparking via Flickr.

Photo by freeparking via Flickr.

On Knowing Your Demographics

Museums spend plenty of time and money dealing with demographics research, figuring out who comes to the museum and why. Unfortunately, it seems that museum goers don’t spend nearly enough time considering whether or not their interests match with the institution they’re about to visit. One Yelp commenter has stepped into the void to provide truly useful information for those considering visiting the Vatican Museum: “…unless you’re religious or into art, it’s lame and uncomfortable.” Did you get that? If you’re not religious, not into art, and not into religious art, it might be best to avoid visiting a massive art museum attached to a massive religious institution that is chock full of religious art. Now you know.

On Truth in Advertising

When I first read this review of the San Diego Zoo, I felt compelled to find out if they were joking. Then I realized I didn’t care.

After an exhaustive journey I sat down for lunch at the Jungle Terrace and ordered what they called an ‘Elephant Burger.’ It was then that I learned the secret they don’t want anybody to know about: they don’t actually serve the animals that they keep at the zoo in the restaurants! There was no freakin’ elephant in my burger at all. Can you believe that!? What a ripoff!

On Existential Questions

Finally, back at the Met, Nathaniel L. poses this age-old question: “If you’re not allowed to touch the paintings, what’s the point in even going?”

—–

Do you have any wonderful negative museum reviews, written or overheard? Share them in the comments below.

Visit

All the Places I Didn’t Go

Photo by Museumist.

One of the places I did go.

It got too hot, which was an odd thing to say for November, especially only two days removed from the white-out snowy conditions of high desert New Mexico. This was a different desert, though. This was drought-be-damned-I’m-growing-a-golf-course Palm Springs. Almost six months into a still-incomplete road trip, pausing in the California oasis town to celebrate Thanksgiving, I suggested a walk down to the Botanical Gardens to check things out. I didn’t make it. It got too hot, and the gardens became just one more place I didn’t visit.

Over the course of my travels, I attended a pre-wedding cocktail party on the roof of the Overture Center for the Arts in Madison, Wisconsin, but didn’t see any of the collection contained within; and it was too near closing time at Hearst Castle when the coast road of Big Sur beckoned. No one shared my enthusiasm—including a three-year-old big rig devotee—for a trip to the Iowa 80 Truck Stop Trucking Museum, and, in an effort to catch the last half of the Women’s World Cup final, I ran past the Cleveland Museum of Contemporary Art to snag a bar stool at a student bar nearby. And, when my car nearly broke down in Bend, Oregon, I began to wonder if it was because it was against a trip to the High Desert Museum.

Excuses, reasons, and explanations aside, sometimes a trip is better off for all the places you were supposed to visit, but didn’t. For instance, I harbor no regrets for missing the Vacuum Cleaner Museum in St. James, Missouri, because further down the road one of the more awesome thunderstorms of my life rolled up as the landscape gave way to the open plains of Oklahoma. The Shell Museum in Sanibel, Florida, surely forgave me for passing up an annual visit in favor of tossing Cat Paws into the Gulf of Mexico with my niece instead. A bowl of artichoke soup at Duarte’s in Pescadero, California, was worth missing out on any of San Francisco’s myriad cultural institutions.

A look from inside Penetrabile at LACMA.

A look from inside Penetrabile at LACMA.

It hasn’t always been this way. I have long assumed the role of tour guide in my family, and my early itineraries were jam-packed with must see sites of cultural and historical import. One day in Rome? You have to see the Vatican Museum. Right? Well, no, it turns out. I’ve learned that being lured away from a planned museum visit for something unexpected is not nearly as disappointing as once believed. That’s not to say I haven’t enjoyed the few museum visits I’ve managed to make over the past year and a half—a walk through the spaghetti-like strands of Penetrabile at LACMA is oddly soothing—but I no longer have that fear of missing out that used to follow a missed museum connection.

Perhaps one day I’ll make it back to Nashville and visit the Johnny Cash Museum, and on a repeat visit to Buffalo I will most likely choose the Albright-Knox instead of Niagara Falls. It’s possible I may stop into the Valley Forge Visitor’s Center instead of walking a six-mile loop around the park for exercise, and it seems unlikely, but I may even make it to the Yellowstone Art Museum in Billings somewhere down the line. But, for now, they’ll just remain some of the many places I didn’t go.

Publications

What I’m Reading: Lost and Found Edition

Napkin Rose. Photo by Tavins Origami via Flickr.

Napkin Rose. Photo by Tavins Origami via Flickr.

1. “The life of a folded napkin is extremely short.” Over at NPR, they delve into the rediscovered art of napkin folding.

2. Speaking of rediscoveries, while the archaeological world was in a tizzy about the possible location of Queen Nefertiti’s tomb, National Geographic felt it wise to remind us that this ancient beauty has been “found” before. One quote following an earlier alleged discovery claimed: “…the identification of the mummy in question as Nefertiti is balderdash (good manners prevent me from using a stronger term.)”

3. Earlier this month, the British Library appealed to the public to help them solve a mystery: what is the indecipherable inscription on this 800-year-old sword? While the message board for speculation has been officially closed, the mystery has not.

4. If you were looking for a good time to get reacquainted with the works of great Irish authors, there is no time like the present. Ireland is in the middle of Yeats2015, a year-long celebration of the 150th anniversary of W.B. Yeats’ birth. Exhibitions, dance performances, plays, concerts, and more reflect the writer’s multidisciplinary approach to the arts.

5. Finally, it’s always fun to observe a museum through another person’s eyes. Go along for the ride when Abi King visits the Acropolis Museum or join Nana Tsay at New York’s Noguchi Museum.

 

 

I'm A Museum Person

I’m a Museum Person: Meredith Whitfield

Photo from tonynetone via Flickr.

Photo from tonynetone via Flickr.

My name is Meredith Whitfield, and I’m a Museum Person.

Tell us a little about yourself.
I’m a D.C. transplant, originally from Tennessee. My “real job” is in internet marketing, but I spend a lot of time volunteering at the Folger Shakespeare Library here in D.C. (and cheerleading for it on Twitter). I fell in love with museums while at the Folger, and I’m in the midst of applying to museology graduate programs.

Why do museums matter to you?
Museums serve so many purposes, especially when they’re accessible, community-friendly spaces. They create supplemental and nontraditional learning experiences, they’re an alternative to consumption-based activities, they start conversations, and they connect us to others through objects and stories. I especially love museums that offer many different types of engagement opportunities. When you choose among art, films, artifacts, activities, social events, an online presence, and whatever other assets the institution has created, the more likely you are to find something that resonates with you.

What is your dream museum job?
For a while, I was convinced that I wanted to be Emily Graslie when I grew up, but I think instead I would love to one day invent the position of Chief Access Officer at a historical collection. Wouldn’t it be cool to pile an exhibition into a food truck/bus/trailer/caravan and tour around the area with stops at community events, like The Uni Project does for libraries? The Folger’s First Folio tour program is so inspiring in this way; our folios are visiting all 50 states, dramatically increasing the ability for Shakespeare lovers to visit a folio AND encouraging more people to discover Shakespeare.

A page from the Voynich Manuscript. Photo from Elusive Muse via Flickr.

A page from the Voynich Manuscript. Photo from Elusive Muse via Flickr.

When you think of the perfect exhibition, what is in it?
I don’t care what’s in it, as long as there’s a great story informing it. The Voynich Manuscript visited the Folger recently, and getting to tell a mystery story about an indecipherable code really got people into the object. I also love exhibitions that incorporate an interactive element. It provides a concrete outlet for interpretation and can start interesting conversations among visitors.

What is the most bizarre museum you’ve ever visited?
The National Museum of Health and Medicine in Silver Spring, MD. It is so worth the trip from D.C. to learn about military history, see how disease affects the human body, and see a row of fetal skeletons. It’s about a mile walk from the metro.

What frustrates you about the way museums operate today? On the flip side, what gives you hope for the future about the way museums operate today?
I’m so thrilled that museums seem to be moving past their more rigid, institutional pasts and are challenging industry standards in creative and interesting ways. It’s been so exciting, as a docent, to help contribute to the way the Folger is thinking about its visitor experience.

I hope one day that all museums will embrace the potential of technology like Cooper-Hewitt has done. Wouldn’t it be great if, for example, your Wikipedia or Google search let you know what artifacts related to your search live at institutions near you? If you could get, for free, the plans to 3D print your own mini Giacometti sculpture at the library? If your public library hosted a book club culminating in a tour of an exhibition curated as a companion to the book?

It’s so rewarding to live in a place where museum are mostly free, and I hope the future sees museums prioritized enough in other cities for this to become a trend. I want to see increased accessibility, exhibitions curated with underserved communities in mind, exhibitions that reflect and inform community trends and sentiments, greater responsiveness, and more FUN.

—–

Thanks to Meredith for sharing her museum experiences with us. If you, or someone you know, is interested in participating in the “I’m a Museum Person” series, send us an email at editor@museumist.com.

 

 

Publications

What I’m Reading

Photo by CPG Grey.

Photo by CPG Grey.

1. Unarguably one of the world’s stranger museums, Iceland’s Phallological Museum is dedicated to dicks. Over at McSweeney’s, Eliese Colette Goldbach has penned an open letter to this niche institution, which includes such lines as “One minute some guy gives you a whale penis, the next you’re the proud owner of a dick museum,” and “The way I see it, you’re only achieving half of your genital potential.”

2. When Alex Marshall sought out the Museum of Mud while in Asuncion, Paraguay, he found that the Museo del Barro was actually a celebration of mud’s prettier, dryer cousin—clay—and a variety of other cultural artworks.

3. Having been on the road myself for the last three months, I was eager to read Andrew Dansby’s “Road Trip Essay: Stumbling Upon Snake Institutions” in the Houston Chronicle. But, it’s behind a pay wall, so it remains unread by me.

4. Not content with Internet Cat Video Film Festivals? Feline film fans can now visit the first ever mainstream museum exhibition dedicated to the phenomenon when “How Cats Took Over the Internet” opens at the Museum of the Moving Image this weekend. Reading about this exhibition, I was made aware of the existence of Meowchat, “where people swapped role-playing messages posing as their cats, talking in a sort of baby talk,” which was illuminating to say the least.

5. This week’s reading roundup ends—rather appropriately, I think—with death. Specifically with Lee Matalone’s trip to the Museum of Death in New Orleans. It’s a poignant visit, because, as the author notes, “the character you are celebrating is Death itself.”

Photo Gallery

Night Lights


In honor of the 125th anniversary of Vincent van Gogh’s death (July 29, 1890), artist Daan Roosegaarde has created a Starry Night inspired bike path in Eindhoven, Netherlands. Learn more about the project here.

I'm A Museum Person

I’m A Museum Person: Amy Cotterill

Colchester Castle is just one of the many museums Amy works with. Photo by giborn_134 via Flickr.

Colchester Castle is just one of the many museums Amy works with. Photo by giborn_134 via Flickr.

My name is Amy Cotterill, and I’m a Museum Person.

Tell us a little about yourself.

I’m the Museum Development Officer for the UK county of Essex. My job is to support all the museums in the county—most of which are volunteer run—with collections care, business sustainability, and audience engagement. I started off studying Ancient History and Archaeology, followed by Cultural Heritage Management, and worked in a variety of learning and engagement roles in different museums before starting my current role last January.

In my spare time, I help run a local branch of the Young Archaeologists Club, volunteer for the Museums Association, the Group for Education in Museums, and the Digital Learning Network. So, you could say I’m a complete museum geek! I do have non-museumy hobbies too: I’m a member of the Women’s Institute, and I love reading, photography, and going to the movies.

You deal with hundreds of museums in your job, whereas most museum professionals deal with just one. Can you share a few insights into how difficult or rewarding that can be?

I cover a pretty big patch, with an astounding variety of museums. The biggest is a Norman castle, which has a team of professional staff and local authority funding. The smallest takes up half a railway carriage. Most of them are local history museums, but I also work with WW1 and WW2 airfields, art collections, a Natural History Museum and even a Pirate Radio Museum! They all have very different needs, including issues with governance and trustee structures, securing funding or even just getting people through the door. I have to know about all different aspects of running a museum (or know who else to ask for advice!) but it’s really rewarding because the role really makes a difference. I’m helping keep museums open and their collections in good condition and available to the public.

Why do museums matter to you?

My previous museum roles have been in community outreach and engagement, so I’ve seen first-hand the difference they can make. I’ve worked with young offenders, teenage asylum seekers, adults with learning disabilities, and children in care—all of whom have lit up when visiting a museum. The collections they hold inspire creativity as well as teaching us about our past and the world around us. Families come together to explore the contents of our glass cases. Museums aren’t just a place for learning; they are a place for fun!

Photo by the lost gallery via Flickr.

Photo by the lost gallery via Flickr.

What is your favorite museum memory?

My favourite childhood museum memory is of the Museum of London’s Great Fire exhibit. You stood in a room with a model of London in front of you, listening to Samuel Pepys’ diary describe what happened. A spark started in the model and slowly the flames spread across the model and onto the walls around you. I was completely enthralled!

My favourite memory as a museum professional is from a project I co-created with a group of young people, developing workshops for younger children. About a year later, one of the participants came to a public workshop I was running and told me he’d applied to study childcare at college because he’d enjoyed working on the project so much.

What museum would you love to visit that you haven’t been to yet?

Can I only pick one? There are so many! The Rijksmuseum, the Louvre, the Smithsonian…but the one that tops the list is The Crime Museum (also known as The Black Museum). It’s the collection of Scotland Yard and is made up of items connected to some of the most chilling crimes in British history. It’s not that I’m ghoulish, it’s just that it’s only open to police officers and even then only by appointment. Not being allowed to see it makes me want to even more.

What is your favorite museum that you have visited so far?

Ruling out all the museums I work with in Essex (you can’t ask me to choose between them!) my favourite is probably the Natural History Museum in Tring. I used to visit on rainy afternoons while I was growing up so it holds a lot of fond memories. It houses some amazing examples of Victorian taxidermy, including Mexican fleas dressed in full sets of clothes—someone actually sewed clothes for fleas!

When you think of the perfect exhibition, what is in it?

It’s not the subject, but how you present it. My favourite exhibitions have all had clear themes with text panels which presented the information in an understandable way without being patronising—usually with different levels of information so you can either take away the gist or read deeper if you wish. For example, I hate gardening, but really enjoyed my visit to the Garden Museum because they present things so well. However, I’ve seen archaeology exhibitions that I’ve expected to love and found disappointing because there was nothing to connect with non-academic audiences.

Photo from Historic Royal Palaces online store.

Photo from Historic Royal Palaces online store.

What is the most random item you’ve bought in a museum gift shop?

When I was a child, it seemed like all of my friends had wooden rulers that listed the kings and queens of England in chronological order on the back. I really wanted one, but could never convince my parents. Two years ago, I was working for English Heritage as Education Manager for their London properties and spotted these rulers in the gift shop of Wellington’s House and couldn’t resist.

What museum would you move into for a month if you could?

Eltham Palace in Greenwich. It was given to Edward II in 1305 and was a royal residence through to the 16th Century. Henry VIII spent much of his childhood there and the Tudor courts often used it for their Christmas celebrations. However, it fell into disuse and ruin. In the 1930s a new house was built incorporating much of the original building including the Great Hall. It has the most beautiful Art Deco interiors. It’s just fabulous!

What’s the most bizarre museum you’ve ever visited?

Lumina Domestica (The Lamp Museum) in Bruges. My husband and I visited last year while we were on holiday because we could get a joint ticket with the Chocolate Museum and the Frites Museum. It was actually really interesting, telling the story of man-made lighting through the centuries. I would definitely recommend a visit if you get the chance!

Photo by JD Hancock via Flickr.

Photo by JD Hancock via Flickr.

There seem to be a million books and movies set in museums. Do you have a favorite?

I could try and come up with a really intellectual answer for this, but if I’m honest it’s Ghostbusters 2. We’ve all seen portraits that look like they’ve got an evil being trapped inside waiting to escape. Plus, it has the Statue of Liberty dancing through the streets of New York—what’s not to love?

What angers/upsets/frustrates you about the way museums operate today? On the flip side, what pleases/amuses/gives you hope for the future about the way museums operate today?

People have donated objects to public museums in the belief that they’ll be looked after by professionals and enjoyed by future generations, so it upsets me when funding is cut to the point where museums aren’t able to properly care for their collections or stay open. When councils sell off museum objects to plug gaps in other parts of their budget, they’re betraying not only the original donor but everyone who’s invested in that museum through their taxes or donations.

However, there is much to give us hope for UK museums. Every week, I meet museum staff and volunteers who love what they do and have so much passion for their collections. The Museums Association’s publication Museums Change Lives illustrates the hard work museums of all sizes are doing to make a difference in their local communities.

Gift Shop

Museumist 2014 Holiday Gift Guide: 10 Gifts for Music Lovers

Photo by Claude Valette via Flickr.

Photo by Claude Valette via Flickr.

Any lover of music should appreciate Kandinsky, the abstract artist who once said: “Color is the keyboard, the eyes are the harmonies, the soul is the piano with many strings. The artist is the hand that plays, touching one key or another, to cause vibrations in the soul.” Consider a print of his work or maybe a notecard set.

Photo from Smithsonian Store.

Photo from Smithsonian Store.

If you have a  jazz aficionado on your list, consider a comprehensive box set from the Smithsonian—Jazz: The Smithsonian Anthology—which explores the genre over six CDs and a 200-page companion book.

Photo from MCA Store.

Photo from MCA Store.

The touring exhibition David Bowie Is was a smash when it launched at the V&A, and it is currently enjoying great success at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art. Why not share the wonderful world of this music icon with your friends and family by gifting the official exhibition catalog (V&A hardcover or MCA softcover)?

Photo from MCA Store.

Photo from MCA Store.

Perhaps you’re in the market for a less bulky David Bowie offering? Consider these rather awesome lightning bolt earrings.

Photo from Grammy Museum Store.

Photo from Grammy Museum Store.

Having worked in a museum gift shop, t-shirts are a common request (along with the absurd and impossible request for a small, lightweight catalog of the museum’s entire collection, but I digress…) Try this comfortable-looking offering from the Grammy Museum.

Photo from Ashmolean Museum Store.

Photo from Ashmolean Museum Store.

If your gift recipient is a little more classical in their musical leanings, the catalog from the Ashmolean’s relatively recent Stradivarius exhibition might catch their fancy.

Photo from Autry Museum Store.

Photo from Autry Museum Store.

Let’s say someone’s response to the question “What do you want for Christmas this year?” was “Sing me a song of the saddle,” then I have the perfect gift idea for you. Cowboy Songs, a 62-song collection sold at the Gene Autry Museum, will be a perfect addition to any cowboy crooner lover’s playlist.

 

Photo from Goodreads.

Photo from Goodreads.

Another gem from the Lower East Side Tenement Museum: winner of the 2010 National Book Award for Nonfiction, Just Kids is a memoir of singer-songwriter Patti Smith’s relationship with Robert Mapplethorpe in 1960s New York.

 

Photo from Neue Gallerie Shop.

Photo from Neue Gallerie Shop.

The Neue Gallerie in New York is wonderful for coffee lovers because of its Viennese-inspired cafes, and art lovers get to enjoy glittering Klimt’s in the galleries, but music lovers can find their spot in the gift shop where books delve into operatic maestro Richard Wagner or a visual look at Mahler.

 

Photo from EMP Store.

Photo from EMP Store.

Taking Punk to the Masses: From Nowhere to Nevermind, a publication exclusively made for Seattle’s Experience Music Project, is an essential guide to the punk rock scene.

Gift Shop

Museumist 2014 Holiday Gift Guide: 10 Gifts for Foodies

Photo by Edward Blake via Flickr.

Photo by Edward Blake via Flickr.

Wisconsin’s Mustard Museum is a regular member of the “Can you believe there is a museum about this?” club. But, if you’re a mustard lover like me, you think it makes total sense. Plus, their store has plenty on offer. Try giving a Gourmet Mustard Gift Set or some mustard making supplies.

Photo by Geraint Rowland via Flickr.

Photo by Geraint Rowland via Flickr.

Food: Our Global Kitchen, the tasty exhibition at the National Geographic Museum in D.C., will whet your appetite. So, it’s a good thing that they have a Test Kitchen serving up tasty treats through late February.

Photo from Barnes Foundation Shop.

Photo from Barnes Foundation Shop.

The Barnes Foundation has six teas whose flavor profiles reflect a particular artwork or artist in the foundation’s collection. Think Renoir Rooibos, Gauguin Mango, and Cezanne Citrus.

Photo by Howard Lake via Flickr.

Photo by Howard Lake via Flickr.

Do you know someone who complains about how there aren’t enough food museums out there? Well, help them get New York’s first food museum with exhibits you can eat up and running by donating to the Museum of Food and Drink.

yeschef

The American Swedish Institute in Minneapolis celebrates all things Swedish, including its yummy Scandinavian cuisine. So, it’s no surprise to see that they have renowned Swedish-Ethiopian chef Marcus Samuelsson’s Yes, Chef for sale in their gift shop. You can buy it online, but if you buy it at the museum you can give yourself a present by eating lunch at their delicious Fika restaurant.

Photo from British Library Shop.

Photo from British Library Shop.

What do you buy someone with a large collection of cookbooks? How about another cookbook, but this one is a beautifully illustrated take on 14th and 15th century dishes and dining.

Photo from goodcandlebk.com.

Photo from goodcandlebk.com.

Instead of traditional pine-scented candles, gift the tummy-rumbling scents of fig, basil, or rosemary instead. Good Candle makes hand-poured soy wax candles in Brooklyn and you can buy online or at the following museums: Museum of Arts and Design, Brooklyn Museum, and Contemporary Arts Museum Houston.

Photo from Brooklyn Museum Shop.

Photo from Brooklyn Museum Shop.

Because Christmas isn’t Christmas without a Mondrian cake. Modern Art Desserts.

Photo from Lower East Side Tenement Museum Shop.

Photo from Lower East Side Tenement Museum Shop.

The Lower East Side Tenement Museum’s gift shop is full of amazing books, and more than a few cover food related topics. For instance, The Bagel: The Surprising History of a Modest Bread sounds like an interesting read.

Photo from SFMOMA Store.

Photo from SFMOMA Store.

Museum gift stores can actually be great places to pick up amazing kitchen gadgets and home goods, like this Stainless Steel French Press at SFMOMA.

Photo by llee Wu via Flickr.

Photo by llee Wu via Flickr.

Yes, I know that the post promised you 10 gifts, but here’s a bonus gift, and guess what? It’s free. The Monterey Bay Aquarium is a world leader in promoting sustainable seafood consumption, and their free Seafood Watch App will help you buy and eat your fruits from the sea responsibly.